Bring Python to Your .NET Development with IronPython

Python is a high-level programming language that has gained popularity in recent years for its emphasis on clear code that is easy to read, combined with surprising power and flexibility. Because Python is free and open-source, it has become a widely used scripting language primarily for web-based applications…but did you know that a little help from the .NET framework can bring your Python apps to the desktop, complete with a graphical user interface? IronPython is a handy tool that will allow you to enjoy the perks of .NET development with your favorite language, Python.

IronPython is a version of Python that is tightly integrated with .NET, originally developed and maintained by a team of Microsoft engineers but recently released to the open-source community. IronPython integrates with Microsoft Visual Studio and allows you to combine traditional Python code with .NET technologies, including Windows Forms and WPF for UI design. The result is a Python-coded application that looks and behaves no differently than any other Windows program, which is a big improvement over the command-line programs typical of the language.

'Hello World' with IronPython

But how exactly does IronPython fit into the .NET world? The diagram below shows the basic functionality where the Python code makes calls to both the .NET framework classes as well as Python libraries. The Python code is then compiled by the IronPython Engine and converted to assembly code that can be executed by the .NET runtime.

IronPython isn’t just for the desktop and can be used to develop web applications that integrate with Silverlight, a Microsoft framework similar to Adobe Flash. If you’re worried about pigeon-holing yourself into Windows with .NET, fear not, IronPython is supported by Mono, an open-source and cross-platform alternative to .NET. Likewise, if you don’t have the money to throw down on a license for Visual Studio, IronPython Studio is a free IDE that runs from the Visual Studio Shell.

So, if you’re a Python developer and want to make user-friendly apps that can take advantage of all that .NET has to offer, bust out of your command-line world give IronPython a spin.